Knowledge Sharing for Climate Change Adaption

Adapting to Climate Change in China (ACCC)

Adapting to Climate Change in China (ACCC)

Associated Organization: Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (Switzerland); National Development and Reform Council (China); the INTASAVE-CARIBSAVE Group (Global)

The overarching aim of Phase 1 of the China and South-South Scoping Assessment for Learning and Development initiative is to identify key opportunities and avenues for South-South learning and climate compatible development and how to best channel resources to share China's and developing countries' experiences of integrating climate adaptation into the development process. This project is being implemented in ten (10) countries across three regions including Africa (Angola, Ethiopia, Kenya, South Africa, Rwanda); Asia (Bangladesh, Nepal, Indonesia) and the Caribbean (Grenada, Jamaica). Final outputs from Phase 1, including the Full Report and Country Reports follow details on the project below.

Read more at www.ccadaptation.org.cn

 

 

 

 

 

Themes: Agriculture, fisheries and food security, Climate Science, Forestry, Gender, Health, Poverty and vulnerability, Water

Regions: Africa

Countries:

Followers: 1 people are following this project

Overview:

The project Adapting to Climate Change in China (ACCC) is an innovative policy research initiative focusing on linking climate change research with policy making and development. ACCC started in June 2009 as a collaboration between UK, China and Switzerland; it is funded by DFID China, the Swiss Agency for Development Cooperation, DFID Research and the UK Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC). ACCC is building on the results of a long standing collaboration between UK and China in the area of climate change adaptation. The main national institutional partner is the Chinese National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) which is responsible for the formulation of Five Year National development plans and has also the mandate to coordinate climate change actions both in adaptation and mitigation.